Adobe Premiere Pro Editing Post Production

Lumetri scopes functionality: A beginners guide

Lumetri scopes are one of the most important features in Adobe Premiere Pro. If you have a poorly lit room, an old monitor, or light painted walls – this may distort your view.

You may think you’ve colour corrected it, but actually, your original footage has been miscalibrated. This happens more often than you think.

Below we have broken down each aspect of the Lumetri Scopes functionality and how you can apply the Lumetri scopes in Adobe Premiere Pro yourself.

You can also watch our breakdown below in the YouTube video. Our editor Philip talks you through Lumetri scopes and how you can use Lumetri Scopes to colour your video.

This will help you create a solid grading and create a cinematic look on your current footage.

The Lumetri scopes

*To open the Lumetri scope’s functionality: 

[Window –> Workspaces –> Color]

Waveform

Screenshot 2020-01-21 at 12.59.40

Waveform displays the intensity of the signal. This shows the levels of each pixel and the location within the image/video. You can also select which waveform you wish to use.

They are displayed with IRE units. Measured (White) 0-100 (Black). You can view in RGB which shows the RGB signals, luna waveform (brightness and contrast ratio), and the YC.

YC or YC (no chroma). This displays the chrominance and luminance in YC and the luminance only in YC (no chroma).

READ MORE: The top 5 starter cameras for beginner filmmakers

Vectorscope

Vectorscope

This shows the chrominance information. This is a circular chart that shows the saturation which can be measured outwards. The vivid colours show up as a pattern far from the centre of the chart. Whereas the black and white imagery only shows up as a dot at the centre of the chart.

READ MORE: How to get that cinematic feel in Adobe Premiere Pro

Histogram

Screenshot 2020-01-21 at 12.59.56

Similar to the waveform, the histogram in Lumetri Scopes shows the intensity of both the chrominance and luminance levels of an image. It reads three main aspects;

The shadows, mid-tones, and highlights.  

The best time to use this feature is when you are correcting your shadows, mid-tones, and highlights. This is to ensure your levels are balanced and you don’t have an unwanted tint to the footage.

We hope you enjoyed the post on Lumetri Scopes, please follow us @ifilmthings. For more filmmaking resources on Premiere Pro and Lumetri Scopes. Let us know your thoughts in the comments section below.

Whilst you’re here, please check out our other articles on Adobe Premiere Pro below:

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