Adobe Premiere Pro Video Editing Software

How to import fonts into Premiere Pro

You usually associate fonts with writing programs, but importing fonts in Premiere Pro is an important bit of knowledge. There will be moments where you’re tasked to use intriguing fonts, mainly for commercial work – and sometimes the default fonts do not cut it. 

But fear not, we have you covered. Fonts can play a key part in video editing, and they can help bring the quality of the production to the next level. Commercial work usually needs funky fonts, so it’s important you can get these intriguing fonts imported into Premiere Pro.

In today’s article, we will look at how to add and remove fonts in Premiere Pro and look at some of the best fonts in Premiere Pro. 

Let’s check it out!

How to import fonts in Premiere Pro

Here’s how to import a new font into Premiere Pro. To begin:

  • Open up Creative Cloud. 
  • Then in the right-hand corner, click the Fonts icon. 
  • This will open up the Fonts window. Click “browse more”
  • You will now be directed to Adobe Fonts. 
  • Now you can browse through all of the different fonts and choose which one you wish to use in Premiere Pro. 
  • Toggle the “Activate Fonts” button to sync them to Creative Cloud and click activate. 
  • When you refresh Premiere Pro, you will access your newly found fonts.  

Learn: how to add a title in Premiere Pro.

How to remove fonts in Premiere Pro

Very similar to the above, but a little quicker. To remove fonts in Premiere Pro, simply use one of the three following methods:

  • Select the “Deactivate” switch next to an individual font you wish to remove and remove the single font.
  • Click the “Deactivate” switch next to the font family you wish to remove and remove the entire font family.
  • Finally, you can use the “Bulk Deactivate tool” and select larger groups of individual and family fonts to remove.
Remove fonts in Premiere Pro

The best fonts for Premiere Pro

Here is a breakdown of the best fonts to use in Premiere Pro. Finding the right font for your project takes time, so we thought to help you out, we would put together a breakdown of the best fonts for Premiere Pro. 

Let’s check them out: 

Averox

Averox - Premiere Pro font.

Averox is a futuristic-looking font for Premiere Pro. It’s brilliant for the Sci-Fi genre or if you’re looking to create a commercial with an edge. Averox works perfectly. 

It’s an easy to use font and the perfect option for entering into a dystopian universe.

STIXGeneral

This is from the “Serif” family. It’s smooth and professional looking. Perfect for documentaries and news videos. It works well over dark backgrounds when introducing the story. 

It’s pretty professional looking and offers a formal feel to your video. Definitely not one to use for a fun video. But if you’re creating a hard hitting documentary, STIXGeneral fits perfectly.

Lucida Grande

It’s an actual default font in Premiere Pro. It’s a simple Sans Serif font, but perfect for opening credits. Whether it’s a short film, or a Hollywood blockbuster – Lucinda Grande will work wonders. 

Smooth, slick and just generally looks good. Access is already in Premiere Pro and get those opening credits looking sleek.

Varshuma

This font is a creative font, with a swirly design. Funnily enough, most fonts that use a twirl typeface are pretty hard to read. But Varshuma is easy to read. It’s the perfect font when editing your commercial videos in Premiere Pro. 

YouTuber’s love the font as it adds a fun element to the title of your project. Use this font today to bring a fun dimension to the forefront of your project. 

Check out: Best free transition in Premiere Pro

We hope this article on “How to import fonts into Premiere Pro” was useful for you. Let us know your thoughts down below in the comments. 

Happy editing!

How to add black bars in Premiere Pro

When you’re watching a blockbuster in the cinema, you see those black bars that scream cinematic marvel. It adds another layer to your film. That, paired with the perfect color grading, adds that next level of authenticity to your creation. New creators often ask us, “how can I add black bars in Premiere Pro?”. Letterboxing […]

How to soften a keyframe in Premiere Pro

Most people will usually use After Effects to smooth and soften a keyframe. But that doesn’t have to be the case. Today’s tutorial shows you how to soften a keyframe in Premiere Pro. One of the best tools to soften a keyframe in Premiere Pro is to use the graph editor. We delve into how […]

Adjust saturation in Premiere Pro

When you import your footage into Premiere Pro, you will want to colour correct it and emphasise certain moods and tones. Here we show you how to adjust saturation in Premiere Pro. Saturation is imperative in post-production to increase or decrease the intensity of the colour in the video. This article looks at what saturation […]

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: