How To Export A Frame In Final Cut Pro in 3 Easy Steps

In this quick article, I will be breaking down how to export a frame in final cut pro. We have all gotten to the end of a project and watched back our masterpiece only to find that somewhere in the middle there was something awry in our edit. Whether that’s vfx that didn’t work or the color got weird. No? That hasn’t happened to you?

That’s amazing and please pat yourself on the back for that! One day it might, and I’m here to prepare you for that doomsday. Now let’s get to the tutorial.

Why Would You Export Individual Frames

The biggest reason why I export either a single frame or a small clump of frames is if something is glitching like an effect or the color isn’t sitting right. Can you imagine having to sit through a full export of a feature film just to check one small thing in a scene?

It happens to the best of us, but I don’t recommend it. Being able to export the one chunk that you need is such a time saver.

In the below example, I will be using a visual example from one of our films, “Influencer”.

This short was an official selection and audience choice award for the 2020 72 Hour Film Shootout.

In a push to gain fame, Callie experiences the highs and lows of her journey to becoming an influencer.

How To Export a Frame In Final Cut Pro

I will be using a visual example from one of our films, “Influencer”. Feel free to check it out!

1. Find the Start Point

Export Frame In Final Cut Pro: First Step
Hover over spot > Press I

Find the start of where you want to export with your cursor and hover over that spot. Then hit the “I” key. That will automatically set your range as your in point and you will see a yellow bracket around where your cursor was.

  • Hover over spot > Press I

2. Set Your Out Point

Export Frame In Final Cut Pro: Second Step
Arrow key to move frame by frame > Press O

Find the out point by using your arrow key to move a single frame or as many frames as you want. If you want a whole scene you can move your cursor to hover over the fame you want to end on.

Then hit the “O” key. That will set your out point range and you will see the yellow bracket close on the right side.

  • Arrow key to move frame by frame > Press O

3. Export Your Clip

Export Frame In Final Cut Pro: Third Step
File > Share > Export Master File

Now it’s time to export your clip. Go to File > Share > Export Master File. Adjust your settings to meet your needs and export. That’s it!

  • File > Share > Export Master File

Pay Attention to Your Export Settings

Export Frame In Final Cut Pro: Fourth Step

In the Export Settings Make sure you have your format set to video, video & audio, or just audio depending on what it is you are trying to check. Then under video codec, export in H.264 to save room on your computer or hard drive.

Expert Tip #1: Wrong In and Out Points

If you accidentally select the wrong in and out points don’t worry!

Just navigate to the right part with your cursor or your left and right keys and simply hit “I” for your in or “O” for your out to reset them. Your brackets will adjust to your new ranges!

Expert Tip #2: Your Export Settings

Your export settings will automatically be the same from the last time you exported something so make sure to check those every time you export anything! Final Cut doesn’t allow you to make export presets at this time.

If you are interested, here is How to export a video in Final Cut Pro.

And That’s How to Export A Frame In Final Cut Pro

As you can see by the above instructions, it’s a pretty easy process to export a frame in Final Cut Pro.

I hope you found this article on how to export a frame in final cut pro helpful! If nothing else, it will save you lots of time waiting for a full export. Happy filmmaking!

Photo of author

Courtney Birk

Courtney Birk is a Los Angeles-based actress, colorist, and multi-media artist. She’s never quite satisfied with having enough artistic outlets – so she’s usually painting, singing, and collaborating with her best friend to find creative ways for new storytelling. Her passion for the arts has driven her to work in many different mediums, including music, fine art, theater and film production.

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