DSLR Cameras DSLR Review

Canon EOS 2000D: An in-depth review

In our previous guide to the best DSLRs for beginners, we explained that the Canon EOS 2000D was one of the best cameras for novices thanks to its simple functioning and quality pictures.

As one of our favourite cameras, we thought it would be useful to compile an in-depth Canon EOS 2000D review so that you can decide for yourself whether this could be an excellent choice for you.

Canon EOS 2000D: A general overview

The Canon EOS 2000D is one of the latest cameras to enter the DSLR market. It replaces the Canon EOS 1300D, with a focus on providing customers with a competitively priced entry-level option.

Compared to other compacts, the low price makes this camera ideal for those who are willing to sacrifice some high-level features in exchange for a better price.

However, the features themselves are relatively impressive for a highly affordable DSLR, with the EOS 2000D benefiting from an upgraded 24.1MP chip.

The DIGIC 4+ processor is the same image processor that Canon used in the previous 1300D model, starting to show its age. Nonetheless, the sensitivity sits at ISO100-6400 and can be expanded to 12800.

The 9-point AF system with a 95% optical viewfinder is included, rather than the newer Dual Pixel system, which is excellent for focusing live views. However, for a standard entry DSLR, it certainly does its job. A feature which may be a drawback for some is the flush 3-inch display screen which is used instead of a more modern touchscreen option.

The Canon EOS 2000D offers full 1920x1080HD recording in terms of video quality, with 24, 25 and 20fps frame rates. This isn’t quite up to the standard of the latest 4K capabilities, but full HD video recording is likely sufficient for most users.

Canon doesn’t tend to include 4K video within its entry-level DSLR range, so if this is essential, you may need to look to another brand.

When it comes to connectivity, users benefit from NFC and WiFi connections. However, there is no low-power Bluetooth connectivity available, which is disappointing as it is not possible to maintain a constant connection with mobile devices.

If Canon had included this feature, it would have been possible to quickly share photos online.

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Design and build

Those familiar with the previous Canon EOS 1300D will notice that the new 2000D is identical on the surface, thanks to the same logical button design.

This is great for those who were a fan of the older model, however, the overall exterior does feel a little basic due to the sheer amount of plastic when compared to other options.

The handling is excellent, with a comfortable textured front and rear grip combined with a sensible button layout. For example, the Quick Menu button will allow you to access the most common settings without having to navigate a series of menus.

Although, when you do access the main interface, you will find that it is clean and simple, with a feature guide that allows users to swap quickly between shooting modes.

The clean layout is tried and tested by Canon, so you find the familiar main exposure option on the top plate’s right-hand side, with the power button, flash, shutter release and input dial all conveniently located. To the rear, the other controls are located to the right of the LCD screen, with a similar easy-to-use arrangement.

The LCD display monitor is exactly what you would expect from a budget DSLR, with a lack of high resolution, touchscreen capabilities or even the tilt feature found in more luxurious cameras. However, it is clear, bright and the graphics are sharp.

The menu is well designed with colour-coded options and shortcuts to the most common functions.

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Performance

There is no doubt that this is one of the slowest DSLRs on the market; however, this will not be an issue for many users. Although, if you are looking to shoot high-speed action or a quick burst, you may struggle with the Canon EOS 2000D.

This isn’t unusual for the entry-level DSLR models, so the 3fps shooting rate should not put you off if you are searching for a low-cost DSLR.

The camera uses a 3:2 sensor, whereas the rear screen is based on a 4:3 ratio, which is unusual as it makes it slightly more difficult to review images. For example, if you use the Live View function, you will see black lines along the top and bottom of the screen.

In terms of metering, this DSLR offers Partial, Evaluative, Spot, and Centre-weighted metering. We found that these provided great performance in most conditions. In particular, in very bright conditions, the highlights were retained.

In addition, the optional Ambiance Priority is available within the automatic white balance mode, which will enable users to retain a warmer finish in shots wherever desired.

When it comes to the battery life, Canon estimates that the EOS 2000D will last for 500 shots, which is competitive when compared to similarly priced cameras.

However, there are better options, such as the Nikon D240, which offers an awe-inspiring 1200 shots.

Autofocus system

The Canon EOS 2000D uses the slightly dated 9-point autofocus system, which is based on a diamond layout. We found that it is biased towards the centre of the frame, so you may find that you need to re-frame regularly if objects are slightly off centre.

You can expect to spend time focusing and re-focusing, which can be difficult if you are looking to take a quick shot.

In terms of autofocus performance, this camera is ideal for general shooting, but it does feel slightly sluggish, particularly in low light levels. However, in ordinary daylight, it does a fairly decent job of locking onto a subject without any struggle.

Although there are rival DLSRs that offer improved coverage and speeds via their autofocus systems, it is likely they will cost more, and you will probably lose the viewfinder feature.

If you are looking for highly responsive shooting, we recommend models with the brilliant Canon Dual Pixel CMOS autofocus system, although they will cost you more.

Image quality

Canon EOS 2000D

The upgraded 24.1MP sensor is excellent, and it provides brilliant detail retention when compared to the previous 1300D model.

The sensor provides an extra 6 million pixels whilst still offering great noise handling. However, if you are shooting JPEG files, you may find that detail is softened due to the camera trying to balance noise. However, if you are shooting below ISO3200, this will be barely noticeable.

The actual dynamic range of this DSLR is good, and it is possible to recover some details which are often lost in highlighted and shadowed areas. This is great if you regularly shoot raw files. However, there are rival options that provide a higher level of detail recovery.

The exposure modes are covered well, with a variety of scene programs included, such as manual, aperture, and shutter modes. In addition, within flash modes, there is an option for first and second curtain sync, alongside compensation for flash exposure.

Users can choose from the standard picture styles, such as landscape and portrait mode. However, it is the five creative filters that are likely to appeal to novice photographers.

These include soft focus, toy camera, black and white, fisheye, and a miniature effect, which can be easily applied post-capture to JPEGs. This is a great way for beginners to gain some experience with in-camera editing.

Our verdict on the Canon EOS 2000D

If you are looking for an easy-to-use camera with well-laid-out controls, this is an ideal option. The simple style and long battery life make the Canon EOS 2000D a great choice for beginners.

However, for experienced filmmakers, the 1080p video, 3fps burst shooting, and slightly slow live view focusing may not be up to the job.

Canon has a history of delivering excellent DSLR cameras for all levels and budgets, with the Canon EOS 2000D being an important model within the beginner sector.

If you are a novice photographer or filmmaker, Canon knows that you are more likely to upgrade to another Canon model, especially if you already own compatible accessories and lenses. This means that the entry-level options are well-designed, with features and handling that guide you towards the perfect shot.

To find out more about the best DSLRs or to discuss the Canon EOS 2000D in more detail with our team, please contact us today.

If you are keen to read more, simply check out our individual DSLR reviews below, or click here to read our DSLR Buyers Guide.

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